English and French Love Poetry

Угледни час (додатне наставе)- корелација: Енглески и француски језик:

датум: 18.03.2015.
ЕНГЛЕСКИ ЈЕЗИК                                                          Весна Милић, проф. енглеског језика
Одељење: 3/2, 3/3                                       
 ФРАНЦУСКИ ЈЕЗИК                                                       Нада Степановић, проф. француског језика                Одељење: 3/2                                 

                                                                                                               

НАСТАВНА ТЕМА: Француска и енглеска љубавна поезија

English Love Poetry

  1. Lord Byron: When we two parted

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    Burns: Auld Lang Syne (Should Old Acquaintance be Forgot)

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    Shelly: Love’s Philosophy

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    Burns: Red,Red Rose

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    Arnold: Longing

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    Shakespeare: Sonnet 18

    Love’s Philosophy
    by Percy Bysshe Shelley
    (1803-1822)
    The fountains mingle with the river,
    And the rivers with the ocean;
    The winds of heaven mix forever,
    With a sweet emotion;
    Nothing in the world is single;
    All things by a law divine
    In one another’s being mingle;–
    Why not I with thine?
    See! the mountains kiss high heaven,
    And the waves clasp one another;
    No sister flower would be forgiven,
    If it disdained it’s brother;
    And the sunlight clasps the earth,
    And the moonbeams kiss the sea;–
    What are all these kissings worth,
    If thou kiss not me?
    When we two parted
    by Lord George Gordon Byron
    When we two parted
    In silence and tears,
    Half broken-hearted,
    To sever for years,
    Pale grew thy cheek and cold,
    Colder thy kiss;
    Truly that hour foretold
    Sorrow to this.
    The dew of the morning
    Sank chill on my brow –
    It felt like the warning
    Of what I feel now.
    Thy vows are all broken,
    And light is thy fame:
    I hear thy name spoken,
    And share in its shame.
    They name thee before me,
    A knell to mine ear;
    A shudder comes o’er me –
    Why wert thou so dear?
    They know not I knew thee,
    Who knew thee too well: –
    Long, long shall I rue thee
    Too deeply to tell.
    In secret we met –
    In silence I grieve
    That thy heart could forget,
    Thy spirit deceive.
    If I should meet thee
    After long years,
    How should I greet thee? –
    With silence and tears.
    Longing
    by Matthew Arnold
    Come to me in my dreams, and then
    By day I shall be well again!
    For so the night will more than pay
    The hopeless longing of the day.
    Come, as thou cam’st a thousand times,
    A messenger from radiant climes,
    And smile on thy new world, and be
    As kind to others as to me!
    Or, as thou never cam’st in sooth,
    Come now, and let me dream it truth,
    And part my hair, and kiss my brow,
    And say, My love why sufferest thou?
    Come to me in my dreams, and then
    By day I shall be well again!
    For so the night will more than pay
    The hopeless longing of the day.
    SONNET 18 by Shakespeare
    Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
    Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
    Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
    And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:
    Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
    And often is his gold complexion dimm’d;
    And every fair from fair sometime declines,
    By chance, or nature’s changing course, untrimm’d;
    But thy eternal summer shall not fade
    Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st;
    Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade,
    When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st;
    So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
    So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

    A Red, Red Rose by Robert Burns

    O my Luve’s like a red, red rose,
    That’s newly sprung in June:
    O my Luve’s like the melodie,
    That’s sweetly play’d in tune.
    As fair art thou, my bonie lass,
    So deep in luve am I;
    And I will luve thee still, my dear,
    Till a’ the seas gang dry.
    Till a’ the seas gang dry, my dear,
    And the rocks melt wi’ the sun;
    And I will luve thee still, my dear,
    While the sands o’ life shall run.
    And fare-thee-weel, my only Luve!
    And fare-thee-weel, a while!
    And I will come again, my Luve,
    Tho’ ’twere ten thousand mile!

    Traditional Song Modern English Translation
    Auld Lang Syne
    Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
    And never brought to mind?
    Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
    And days o’ lang syne!
    Chorus:
    For auld lang syne, my dear
    For auld lang syne,
    We’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet
    For auld lang syne!
    We twa hae run about the braes,
    And pu’d the gowans fine,
    But we’ve wander’d mony a weary foot
    Sin’ auld lang syne.
    We twa hae paidl’t in the burn
    Frae morning sun till dine,
    But seas between us braid hae roar’d
    Sin’ auld lang syne.
    And there’s a hand, my trusty fiere,
    And gie’s a hand o’ thine,
    And we’ll tak a right guid willie-waught
    For auld lang syne!
    And surely ye’ll be your pint’ stoup,
    And surely I’ll be mine!
    And we’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet
    For auld lang syne! Times Gone By
    Should old acquaintances be forgotten,
    And never brought to mind?
    Should old acquaintances be forgotten,
    And days of long ago!
    Chorus:
    For times gone by, my dear
    For times gone by,
    We will take a cup of kindness yet
    For times gone by.
    We two have run about the hillsides
    And pulled the daisies fine,
    But we have wandered many a weary foot
    For times gone by.
    We two have paddled (waded) in the stream
    From noon until dinner time,
    But seas between us broad have roared
    Since times gone by.
    And there is a hand, my trusty friend,
    And give us a hand of yours,
    And we will take a goodwill drink (of ale)
    For times gone by!
    And surely you will pay for your pint,
    And surely I will pay for mine!
    And we will take a cup of kindness yet
    For times gone by!

     

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